EUFAR training course “RS4forestEBV”

EUFAR training course “RS4forestEBV”

Application is now open for those interested in participating in the training course funded by the European Facility for Airborne Research (EUFAR) through EU’s 7th Framework Programme will be held at the Bavarian Forest National Park and DLR from 3th to 14th of July 2017. In this training course, the special skills required for processing the new generation of airborne hyperspectral, thermal, and LiDAR data for retrieving essential biodiversity variables in forest ecosystems will be presented. The course features Dr. Hooman Latifi from the Dept. of Remote Sensing of the University of Würzburg.

The ground data collection that will be performed during the first week of the training course at the Bavarian Forest National Park aims to provide the participants (PhD students, post-docs and university lecturers) with knowhow on tools (field spectroscopy, thermal spectrometry and terrestrial LiDAR) and measurement techniques to collect different vegetation variables. In addition, an airborne campaign with a NERC Twin Otter for the concurrent acquisitions of hyperspectral imaging data in visible, near-infrared, shortwave-infrared and longwave-infrared (thermal) wavelengths as well as LiDAR data (with full wave form component) will be organised during the training course if the weather conditions allow.
Data acquired during the training course as well as archived data will be processed and analysed in the hands-on sessions with the support of experienced users of airborne facilities and form the basis for the final scientific report. RS4forestEBV data will also be made available after the training course via the EUFAR website, accessible to all EUFAR registered members.
Furthermore, during the second week, participants will be able to attend certain sessions of the 2nd International Conference on Airborne Research for the Environment (ICARE) that will be held simultaneously on the DLR premises from 10 -13 July 2017.

new publication: “The role of space agencies in remotely sensed essential biodiversity variables”

new publication: “The role of space agencies in remotely sensed essential biodiversity variables”

paganini_rs-ebv_article_2016_framework_remote_sensing_space_agency_geobonOur new article on therole of space agencies in remotely sensed essential biodiversity variables is out in the newest Remote Sensing in Ecology and Conservation issue. From the abstract: “The Group on Earth Observations Biodiversity Observation Network (GEO BON) is developing the Essential Biodiversity Variables (EBVs) as the key variables needed, on a regular and global basis, to understand and monitor changes in the Earth’s biodiversity. A subset of these EBVs can be derived from space-based remote sensing, within this paper referred to as remotely sensed EBVs (RS-EBVs). Given the global, periodic and standardized character of satellite remote sensing measures, RS-EBVs may be seen as easier to generate than non-remotely sensed EBVs, which have to be assembled from disparate and local sources of information. Particularly because they are global and periodic, RS-EBVs are of special relevance for monitoring the state of and changes to biodiversity, notably the structure and function of ecosystems. If well developed, RS-EBVs can provide key information for global biodiversity assessments as well as for national governments to meet their obligations under the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), in particular to formulate and implement appropriate management responses to biodiversity losses. However, the relevance and usage of globally produced RS-EBVs in wide-scale ecological modelling, such as in species distribution and abundance studies or in ecosystem integrity analyses, are still to be demonstrated, in particular when it comes to deriving biodiversity indicators for policy making and implementation. The biodiversity community at large, from those conducting scientific ecological studies to those involved in the development of remote sensing applications for biodiversity monitoring, can gain value from RS-EBVs, but doing so requires close cooperation with space agencies. Effective interaction is only likely to result if the biodiversity community understands how space agencies determine their observation and product requirements. To develop these requirements, space agencies need to precisely specify the physical measurements for their spaceflight instruments, as well as the algorithmic approaches, to generate RS-EBV products from these measurements. Here, we address the biodiversity community to discuss the role space agencies should play in the development of EBVs arising from satellite remote sensing. Importantly, we explain the necessity for translating the observational needs of the biodiversity community into specific satellite remote sensing measurement and algorithm requirements. By summarizing the prerequisite conditions that are required for obtaining a collective and strong engagement of space agencies in the co-development of RS-EBVs, we aim to facilitate collaborative efforts between the biodiversity community and the space agencies, which can ultimately contribute to a global and comprehensive biodiversity knowledge system.”

Paganini, M., Leidner, A. K., Geller, G., Turner, W. and Wegmann, M. (2016), The role of space agencies in remotely sensed essential biodiversity variables. Remote Sens Ecol Conserv, 2: 132–140. doi:10.1002/rse2.29

publication out in the RS-EBV special issue

publication out in the RS-EBV special issue

pettorelli_et_al_2016_rs-ebvOur article in the special issue on RS-EBVs is out on “framing the concept of remote sensing essential biodiversity variables”. From the abstract: Although satellite-based variables have for long been expected to be key components to a unified and global biodiversity monitoring strategy, a definitive and agreed list of these variables still remains elusive. The growth of interest in biodiversity variables observable from space has been partly underpinned by the development of the essential biodiversity variable (EBV) framework by the Group on Earth Observations – Biodiversity Observation Network, which itself was guided by the process of identifying essential climate variables. This contribution aims to advance the development of a global biodiversity monitoring strategy by updating the previously published definition of EBV, providing a definition of satellite remote sensing (SRS) EBVs and introducing a set of principles that are believed to be necessary if ecologists and space agencies are to agree on a list of EBVs that can be routinely monitored from space. Progress toward the identification of SRS-EBVs will require a clear understanding of what makes a biodiversity variable essential, as well as agreement on who the users of the SRS-EBVs are. Technological and algorithmic developments are rapidly expanding the set of opportunities for SRS in monitoring biodiversity, and so the list of SRS-EBVs is likely to evolve over time. This means that a clear and common platform for data providers, ecologists, environmental managers, policy makers and remote sensing experts to interact and share ideas needs to be identified to support long-term coordinated actions.

Pettorelli, N., Wegmann, M., Skidmore, A., Mücher, S., Dawson, T. P., Fernandez, M., Lucas, R., Schaepman, M. E., Wang, T., O’Connor, B., Jongman, R. H.G., Kempeneers, P., Sonnenschein, R., Leidner, A. K., Böhm, M., He, K. S., Nagendra, H., Dubois, G., Fatoyinbo, T., Hansen, M. C., Paganini, M., de Klerk, H. M., Asner, G. P., Kerr, J. T., Estes, A. B., Schmeller, D. S., Heiden, U., Rocchini, D., Pereira, H. M., Turak, E., Fernandez, N., Lausch, A., Cho, M. A., Alcaraz-Segura, D., McGeoch, M. A., Turner, W., Mueller, A., St-Louis, V., Penner, J., Vihervaara, P., Belward, A., Reyers, B. and Geller, G. N. (2016), Framing the concept of satellite remote sensing essential biodiversity variables: challenges and future directions. Remote Sens Ecol Conserv, 2: 122–131. doi:10.1002/rse2.15

new article on RS-EBVs

new article on RS-EBVs

rse215-fig-0001_pettorelli_rsec_srs-ebvour new article on “Framing the concept of satellite remote sensing essential biodiversity variables: challenges and future directions” just got published. It is linked to the previous article on RS-EBVs lead by Skidmore in NATURE.

 

Although satellite-based variables have for long been expected to be key components to a unified and global biodiversity monitoring strategy, a definitive and agreed list of these variables still remains elusive. The growth of interest in biodiversity variables observable from space has been partly underpinned by the development of the essential biodiversity variable (EBV) framework by the Group on Earth Observations – Biodiversity Observation Network, which itself was guided by the process of identifying essential climate variables. This contribution aims to advance the development of a global biodiversity monitoring strategy by updating the previously published definition of EBV, providing a definition of satellite remote sensing (SRS) EBVs and introducing a set of principles that are believed to be necessary if ecologists and space agencies are to agree on a list of EBVs that can be routinely monitored from space. Progress toward the identification of SRS-EBVs will require a clear understanding of what makes a biodiversity variable essential, as well as agreement on who the users of the SRS-EBVs are. Technological and algorithmic developments are rapidly expanding the set of opportunities for SRS in monitoring biodiversity, and so the list of SRS-EBVs is likely to evolve over time. This means that a clear and common platform for data providers, ecologists, environmental managers, policy makers and remote sensing experts to interact and share ideas needs to be identified to support long-term coordinated actions.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/rse2.15/full