new publication: “The role of space agencies in remotely sensed essential biodiversity variables”

new publication: “The role of space agencies in remotely sensed essential biodiversity variables”

paganini_rs-ebv_article_2016_framework_remote_sensing_space_agency_geobonOur new article on therole of space agencies in remotely sensed essential biodiversity variables is out in the newest Remote Sensing in Ecology and Conservation issue. From the abstract: “The Group on Earth Observations Biodiversity Observation Network (GEO BON) is developing the Essential Biodiversity Variables (EBVs) as the key variables needed, on a regular and global basis, to understand and monitor changes in the Earth’s biodiversity. A subset of these EBVs can be derived from space-based remote sensing, within this paper referred to as remotely sensed EBVs (RS-EBVs). Given the global, periodic and standardized character of satellite remote sensing measures, RS-EBVs may be seen as easier to generate than non-remotely sensed EBVs, which have to be assembled from disparate and local sources of information. Particularly because they are global and periodic, RS-EBVs are of special relevance for monitoring the state of and changes to biodiversity, notably the structure and function of ecosystems. If well developed, RS-EBVs can provide key information for global biodiversity assessments as well as for national governments to meet their obligations under the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), in particular to formulate and implement appropriate management responses to biodiversity losses. However, the relevance and usage of globally produced RS-EBVs in wide-scale ecological modelling, such as in species distribution and abundance studies or in ecosystem integrity analyses, are still to be demonstrated, in particular when it comes to deriving biodiversity indicators for policy making and implementation. The biodiversity community at large, from those conducting scientific ecological studies to those involved in the development of remote sensing applications for biodiversity monitoring, can gain value from RS-EBVs, but doing so requires close cooperation with space agencies. Effective interaction is only likely to result if the biodiversity community understands how space agencies determine their observation and product requirements. To develop these requirements, space agencies need to precisely specify the physical measurements for their spaceflight instruments, as well as the algorithmic approaches, to generate RS-EBV products from these measurements. Here, we address the biodiversity community to discuss the role space agencies should play in the development of EBVs arising from satellite remote sensing. Importantly, we explain the necessity for translating the observational needs of the biodiversity community into specific satellite remote sensing measurement and algorithm requirements. By summarizing the prerequisite conditions that are required for obtaining a collective and strong engagement of space agencies in the co-development of RS-EBVs, we aim to facilitate collaborative efforts between the biodiversity community and the space agencies, which can ultimately contribute to a global and comprehensive biodiversity knowledge system.”

Paganini, M., Leidner, A. K., Geller, G., Turner, W. and Wegmann, M. (2016), The role of space agencies in remotely sensed essential biodiversity variables. Remote Sens Ecol Conserv, 2: 132–140. doi:10.1002/rse2.29

publication out in the RS-EBV special issue

publication out in the RS-EBV special issue

pettorelli_et_al_2016_rs-ebvOur article in the special issue on RS-EBVs is out on “framing the concept of remote sensing essential biodiversity variables”. From the abstract: Although satellite-based variables have for long been expected to be key components to a unified and global biodiversity monitoring strategy, a definitive and agreed list of these variables still remains elusive. The growth of interest in biodiversity variables observable from space has been partly underpinned by the development of the essential biodiversity variable (EBV) framework by the Group on Earth Observations – Biodiversity Observation Network, which itself was guided by the process of identifying essential climate variables. This contribution aims to advance the development of a global biodiversity monitoring strategy by updating the previously published definition of EBV, providing a definition of satellite remote sensing (SRS) EBVs and introducing a set of principles that are believed to be necessary if ecologists and space agencies are to agree on a list of EBVs that can be routinely monitored from space. Progress toward the identification of SRS-EBVs will require a clear understanding of what makes a biodiversity variable essential, as well as agreement on who the users of the SRS-EBVs are. Technological and algorithmic developments are rapidly expanding the set of opportunities for SRS in monitoring biodiversity, and so the list of SRS-EBVs is likely to evolve over time. This means that a clear and common platform for data providers, ecologists, environmental managers, policy makers and remote sensing experts to interact and share ideas needs to be identified to support long-term coordinated actions.

Pettorelli, N., Wegmann, M., Skidmore, A., Mücher, S., Dawson, T. P., Fernandez, M., Lucas, R., Schaepman, M. E., Wang, T., O’Connor, B., Jongman, R. H.G., Kempeneers, P., Sonnenschein, R., Leidner, A. K., Böhm, M., He, K. S., Nagendra, H., Dubois, G., Fatoyinbo, T., Hansen, M. C., Paganini, M., de Klerk, H. M., Asner, G. P., Kerr, J. T., Estes, A. B., Schmeller, D. S., Heiden, U., Rocchini, D., Pereira, H. M., Turak, E., Fernandez, N., Lausch, A., Cho, M. A., Alcaraz-Segura, D., McGeoch, M. A., Turner, W., Mueller, A., St-Louis, V., Penner, J., Vihervaara, P., Belward, A., Reyers, B. and Geller, G. N. (2016), Framing the concept of satellite remote sensing essential biodiversity variables: challenges and future directions. Remote Sens Ecol Conserv, 2: 122–131. doi:10.1002/rse2.15

new article on RS-EBVs

new article on RS-EBVs

rse215-fig-0001_pettorelli_rsec_srs-ebvour new article on “Framing the concept of satellite remote sensing essential biodiversity variables: challenges and future directions” just got published. It is linked to the previous article on RS-EBVs lead by Skidmore in NATURE.

 

Although satellite-based variables have for long been expected to be key components to a unified and global biodiversity monitoring strategy, a definitive and agreed list of these variables still remains elusive. The growth of interest in biodiversity variables observable from space has been partly underpinned by the development of the essential biodiversity variable (EBV) framework by the Group on Earth Observations – Biodiversity Observation Network, which itself was guided by the process of identifying essential climate variables. This contribution aims to advance the development of a global biodiversity monitoring strategy by updating the previously published definition of EBV, providing a definition of satellite remote sensing (SRS) EBVs and introducing a set of principles that are believed to be necessary if ecologists and space agencies are to agree on a list of EBVs that can be routinely monitored from space. Progress toward the identification of SRS-EBVs will require a clear understanding of what makes a biodiversity variable essential, as well as agreement on who the users of the SRS-EBVs are. Technological and algorithmic developments are rapidly expanding the set of opportunities for SRS in monitoring biodiversity, and so the list of SRS-EBVs is likely to evolve over time. This means that a clear and common platform for data providers, ecologists, environmental managers, policy makers and remote sensing experts to interact and share ideas needs to be identified to support long-term coordinated actions.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/rse2.15/full

Biodiversity Session at the ESA Living Planet Symposium

Biodiversity Session at the ESA Living Planet Symposium

Biodiversity Session at the ESA Living Planet Symposium
Prague, 9-13 May 2016

The European Space Agency recently announced the organisation of their forthcoming Living Planet Symposium (LPS) 2016 that will take place in Prague, Czech Republic, from 9 to 13 May 2016.

Organised by: Martin Wegmann (University of Wuerzburg), Nathalie Pettorelli (ZSL), Andrew Skidmore (ITC), Sander Mucher (University of Wageningen), Marc Paganini (ESA).

The Living Planet Symposium is a major Earth Observation symposium that is organised every 3 years by the European Space Agency. The previous LPS symposia took place in Edinburgh (2013), Bergen (2010), Montreux (2007)
and Salzburg (2004). In 2013, it attracted over 1,800 participants from all continents. The LPS symposium provides a forum for EO experts to present and discuss their scientific and application research in Earth Observation. It covers the exploitation of satellite data in various thematic domains such as Atmosphere, Oceanography, Cryosphere, Land, Natural Hazards, Climate and Meteorology, Solid Earth. It has also sessions on EO missions, calibration and validation , methodologies and EO products and Science 2.0.

This year a session on “biodiversity and conservation” will be organised with a special focus on the development of (EBVs) from remote sensing,  and on the use of Earth Observation for conversation actions. You are all cordially invited to participate and submit an abstract.

When you submit an abstract you will be requested to select your main theme (i.e. your biodiversity realm such as land, oceanography, cryosphere, etc). When filling in your abstract, you are kindly requested to indicate “Biodiveristy” as one of your keywords. Up to 5 keywords can be provided such as biodiversity but also biomass, coastal zones, wetlands, open science, water quality, LC/LU, GEO, citizen science, etc. Feel free to use any of these keywords but it is essential that biodiversity be included in your abstract.

More information about the event is available at: http://lps16.esa.int

The deadline to submit abstracts is fixed on the 16 October 2016.  Full papers for accepted contributions are required to be provided during the conference and will be published in an ESA Special Publication.

Looking forward to having most of you with us at the LPS 2016.

SCIENCE publication about EBVs

SCIENCE publication about EBVs

BavForest_Hyspex_EcoSens_org_streifen_sued_29_61_C

our article about Essential Biodiversity Variables (EBV) got published in SCIENCE.

Reducing the rate of biodiversity loss and averting dangerous biodiversity change are international goals, reasserted by the Aichi Targets for 2020 by Parties to the United Nations (UN) Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) after failure to meet the 2010 target (1, 2). However, there is no global, harmonized observation system for delivering regular, timely data on biodiversity change (3). With the first plenary meeting of the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) soon under way, partners from the Group on Earth Observations Biodiversity Observation Network (GEO BON) (4) are developing—and seeking consensus around—Essential Biodiversity Variables (EBVs) that could form the basis of monitoring programs worldwide.

 

Essential Biodiversity Variables

SCIENCE – 2013: Vol. 339 no. 6117 pp. 277-278

https://www.sciencemag.org/content/339/6117/277.full